The Role of the Interviewer in Producing Mode Effects: Results From a Mixed Modes Experiment Comparing Face-to-Face, Telephone and Web Administration

  • Steven Hope University College London
  • Pamela Campanelli The Survey Coach
  • Gerry Nicolaas NatCen
  • Peter Lynn Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex
  • Annette Jäckle Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex
Keywords: mode effects, interviewer presence, interviewer effects, satisficing, non-differentiation, acquiescence, middle category effects, primacy, recency, social desirability

Abstract

The presence of an interviewer (face-to-face or via telephone) is hypothesized to motivate respondents to generate an accurate answer and reduce task difficulty, but also to reduce the privacy of the reporting situation. To study this, we used respondents from an existing face-to-face probability sample of the general population who were randomly assigned to face-to-face, telephone and web modes of data collection. The prevalence of indicators of satisficing (e.g., non-differentiation, acquiescence, middle category choices and primacy and recency effects) and socially desirable responding were studied across modes. Results show differences between interviewer modes and web in levels of satisficing (non-differentiation, acquiescence and middle category choices) and in socially desirable responding. There were also unexpected findings of (1) different ways of satisficing by mode and (2) of a telephone mode primacy/positivity effects.
Published
2022-08-10
How to Cite
Hope, S., Campanelli, P., Nicolaas, G., Lynn, P., & Jäckle, A. (2022). The Role of the Interviewer in Producing Mode Effects: Results From a Mixed Modes Experiment Comparing Face-to-Face, Telephone and Web Administration. Survey Research Methods, 16(2), 207-226. https://doi.org/10.18148/srm/2022.v16i2.7771
Section
Articles

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