DOES MILD LEG LENGTH INEQUALITY AFFECT PLANTAR PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION DURING RUNNING?

  • Carla Sonsino Pereira
  • Vitor Tessutti
  • Isabel C.N. Sacco
Keywords: Biomechanics, Plantar Pressure Distribution, Running, Leg Length Inequality

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate if a mild LLI altered plantar pressure distribution during running at approximately 12Km/h. Nowadays running can be considered one of the most important recreational activities, and mild leg length inequality (LLI), which appears to be usual among runners, has been related to running injuries. The hypothesis was that runners with mild LLI would present smaller values of plantar pressure at the lateral heel, and greater values at the medial midfoot at the long limb; and greater values at the lateral heel and lateral midfoot at the short limb in comparison with runners without LLI. Plantar pressure distribution was acquired using Pedar X mobile System. Measurements were performed under the feet of 14 runners distributed in two groups: control (LLI<0.5cm) and inequality (LLI>1.0cm). Contradicting the initial hypothesis, results demonstrated that runners with a mild LLI did not present significant differences in plantar pressure distribution in comparison to subjects without LLI, and between long and short limbs. These findings point out that analysis of plantar pressure distribution was not an efficient method for detecting small asymmetries or possible adjusts in lower limbs during running.
Published
2007-12-12