DISCUSSING „BEAMON PHENOMENON“ --- STUDYING THE EFFECT OF THE PLATEAU ENVIRONMENT ON LONG JUMP

  • G. Hu
  • M. Yu
  • W. Huang

Abstract

Since Bob Beamon set the new world record of long jump at the Olympic games in Mexico City in 1968, which was 55cm longer than the former one, the opinion has been widely accepted that that the plateau environment can help to obviously improve one’s long jump record. Therefore, people frequently sponsor long jump contests at an altitude high above sea level, expecting miracles to appear ( the writer call it “Beamon Phenomenon”). From the perspective of two factors of the plateau: air resistance and oxygen pressure, and based on theoretical mechanics, sports physiology as well astraining practices, this article gives a thorough analysis of “Beamon Phenomenon” and thereby objects to the opinion mentioned at the very beginning. Results After an analysis of Beamon’s world record in long jump and the typical case where Powell broke Bemon’s record at an altitude of low sealevel, this article lists both subjective and objective factors essential to achieving remarkable results in long jump, and the conclusion was that the achievement has nothing to do with altitude but arena and climate conditions.
Section
Coaching and Sports Activities