DOES A CONCENTRIC ONLY SQUAT ILLICIT SIMILAR POTENTIATION OF SQUAT JUMP PERFORMANCE AS A BACK SQUAT?

  • D. Graham
  • A. Harrison
  • E. Flanagan
Keywords: complex training, starting strength, stretch shortening cycle, rugby, sledge

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The stretch shortening cycle (SSC) involves the stretching of musculature immediately prior to being rapidly contracted. This eccentric/concentric coupling produces a more powerful contraction than concentric action alone (Flanagan, 2007). Complex training (CT) hypothesises that a near maximal muscle contraction will enhance the explosive capabilities of the muscle (Docherty et al., 2004). In order for a complex pair (CP) to be effective the exercises must be biomechanically similar (Ebben, 2002). A traditional example of a CP is a back squat (BS) and a depth jump. If the goal of the CP is to improve starting strength (SS) a suitable exercise is the squat jump (SJ). Theoretically a concentric squat (CS) is more biomechanically similar to a SJ than a BS, although not as commonly practiced. A CS does not invoke the SSC, hence motor unit recruitment may be attenuated. The aim of this paper was to examine if the biomechanically similar CP of a CS and SJ will illicit similar potentiation as a BS and SJ CP.