TASK SPECIFIC COORDINATION OF LEG MUSCLES DURING CYCLING

  • Li Li
  • Graham Caldwell
Keywords: cycling, uphill, posture, frequency, coordination

Abstract

Studies on cycling by our group have focused on the effects of modifying grade, posture and cadence. Changing posture (seated vs. standing) has a more profound influence on mechanical and neuromuscular coordination than does changing slope (0 vs. 8% grade). Most of the changes with standing posture occur late in the down-stroke: increased ankle and knee joint moment, reduced hip joint moment and higher activity in specific muscles. Under the influence of lower extremity inertial properties, higher pedaling frequency induces more mechanical and neuromuscular changes at the hip joint than at the knee or ankle. These mechanical and neuromuscular adaptations to environmental and task constraints indicate that training and related movement analysis should be specific to the motion. This supports the notion of task specific training.