DIFFERENCES BETWEEN JUMPING AND SOMERSAULTING FROM A DIVING SPRINGBOARD: A SIMULATION STUDY

  • Kuangyou B. Cheng
  • Mont Hubbard
Keywords: optimization, diVing, surface compliance, muscular activation

Abstract

Maximum-height jumping and jumping for maximizing backward somersault rotations are simulated. The springboard is modeled by a rigid bar with point mass on the tip and a rotational spring on the other hinged end. The planar 4-segment human model is driven by torque actuators at the ankle, knee, and hip. Movement simulation begins from a balanced initial posture and stops at jump takeoff. The objective is to find joint torque activation patterns during board contact so that jump height or the number of backward rotations in flight (determined by takeoff kinematics) is maximized. Kinematic differences between jumps maximizing backward rotations and jumps maximizing height lie mainly in reduced knee angular velocity and consequently bent knees at takeoff. In addition, more significant hip f1exion torque/activation is found in jumps maximizing rotations than that in maximum-height jumps. With reasonable model assumption, this kind of information may be useful for athletic training.
Published
2008-03-16