THE EFFECT OF VARIATIONS IN THE FOOT PEDAL INTERFACE ON THE EFFICIENCY OF CYCLING AS MEASURED BY ENERGY COST

  • Gary T. MORAN
  • Gerorge H. McGlinn
  • Christin Anderson

Abstract

This paper reviews previous work presented at ISBS that examined the differences in cycling biomechanics and muscle activity as a result of variations of pedal and foot position in cycling. The paper then presents findings on the relationship between variations in pedal, foot positions and the energy cost of cycling. All subjects were experienced cyclists and were tested with an adjustable pedal that can be positioned with a varus or valys tilt, toe in or toe out, andlor risers to adjust for limb-length differences. The subjects were first tested with the pedal in a standard pedal position at a work load which is similar to their typical training pace and intensity. During this exercise bout, V02 was measured, as well as heart rate, and a blood sample was drawn. The cyclists then repeated the procedure with the pedal adjusted to a position of improved biomechanical efficiency. The cyclists worked at the same work load, pace and intensity and again V02 and heart rate were measured and a blood sample taken for analysis.