SELECTED METABOLIC AND HEMODYNAMIC RESPONSES TO REPEATED STEADY-STATE BOUTS OF INDOOR CYCLING, UTILISING MARGINAL INCREASES IN MECHANICAL POWER OUTPUT: CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF INDIVIDUAL COMPETITIVE ROAD CYCLISTS USING A PORTABLE ON-BICYCLE C

  • Douglas W. Briggs
  • Frank E. Fedel
  • James A. Foulke
  • Charles B. Woolley
  • Paul D. Stein
  • Hani N. Sabbah
  • Lawrence D. Rink
  • Edward Getts
  • David Burnworth
Keywords: computer

Abstract

Introduction It has been demonstrated by Sanderson, Cavanaugh et a1. (1985), and the authors, (1987 , that impul e and average net power distributions (W) generated about the pedal spindle and crank arms, vary with individual cyclists, either creating a mechanically desirable circular cycling pattern where the impulse is 'smoothed', or a 'butterfly' distribution indicating unequal force distribution(s throughout each pedaling cycle. Based on research performed indoors by Cavanaugh (1985), and Anderson (1986), and this group outdoors at the United States Cycling Federation Camp in Colorado in 1987 and 1988, it appears that techniques employed to reduce the counter-propulsive tangential crank arm forces could possible improve average net power magnitudes produced by individual elite cyclists outdoors during competition, and thus improve their overall time(s) recorded for selected events.
Section
Equipment / Instrumentation