The Effect Of Preventative Drills On Stability Of The Knee In Female Basketball Players

  • G. C.L. Allen
  • M. N. Satern
  • G. Chen
Keywords: basket ball, preventative, knee stability

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to study the effect of incorporating three preventative mechanical principles into the practice sessions of an eighth grade girls' basketball team over the duration of one season on the players' knee stability. Three mechanical principles were utilized by 17 females (age=13.7 yrs, mass=52.2 kg, ht=166.8 cm) during each practice: (a) bent knee landings, (b) accelerated rounded turns, and (c) two-three step stops. Knee stability was assessed prior to and at the conclusion of the season by measuring three variables: (a) knee range of motion in extension and flexion tested by a goniometer, (b) comparative strength of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles tested by an Orthotron at 60 and 180 deg/s, and (c) end of the season joint laxity as an indicator of anterior cruciate ligament displacement tested by a KT-2000 at 28 deg of flexion. A control group of 9 female basketball players (age=12.8 yrs, mass=52.8 kg, ht=160.7 cm) were used for comparison. No significant differences were revealed between groups for knee ROM or joint laxity (L ROM = 145 deg, R ROM = 144 deg; L ACL d = 5.7 mm, R ACL d = 6.5 mm). Significant increases were revealed between pre- and post-season testing for flexion/ extension ratios in both legs at both speeds for experimental subjects (L 60 deg/s = 14%, L 180 deg/s = 15%, R 60 deg/s = 13%, and R 180 deg/s = 8%). A significant decrease was revealed between preand post-season testing for flexion/ extension ratios in the right leg at 180 deg/s for control subjects (7%). Significant increases were revealed between preand post-season testing for p~ak torque of L flexion (6%) at 60 deg/s, L flexion (7%) and extension (13%) at 180 .deg/s, and R flexion (6%) and extension (6%) at 180 deg/s for experimental subjects. A significant increase (p<.05) was revealed between pre- and postseason testing for peak torque of the R leg at 60 deg/s for control subjects (8%). It was concluded that inclusion of the three preventative mechanical principles into practice sessions of eighth grade female basketball players improved flexion/ extension ratios and peak torque values. Therefore, the findings of this study suggest that learning the preventative mechanical principles for landing, pivoting, and stopping skills may increase knee stability, thereby reducing predisposition for knee injuries in female basketball players.