CAN LABORATORY-BASED BIOMECHANICAL TEST RESULTS REFLECT THE PERCEIVED COMFORT DURING OVERGROUND RUNNING?

  • Pui-Iam Wong
  • Echo Y.L. Cheng
  • Youlian Hong
Keywords: force, cushioning, rearfoot, medio-lateral

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship between laboratory-based biomechanical test results and the perceived comfort of subjects obtained from overground running. Twelve male runners were recruited (age=20.3 ± 0.8 years, weight=61.1 ± 5.1 kg, height=171 ± 4 cm). They participated in three tests: Heel Cushioning Test, Rearfoot Movement Test, and Perceived Comfort Test. Human pendulum device with a controlled impact velocity at 1.15m/s was used in the first test to measure the heel cushioning properties. A digital camera was located posterior to the treadmill to record the rearfoot movement in the second test. And a questionnaire that consisted of three questions was used to measure the percevied comfort after overground running. The correlations between variables of Heel Cushioning Test and Perceived Comfort Test ranged from low (r = 0.118) to mediate (r = -0.564), and the correlations between variables of Rearfoot Movement Test and Perceived Comfort Test ranged from low (r = 0.160) to mediate (r = -0.563). Peak force plays an important role in determining the comfort rating. Loading rate was negatively related to perceived comfort in heel cushioning. Total rearfoot motion was found to contribute most in perceived comfort in medio-lateral control.
Published
2007-10-28
Section
Coaching and Sports Activities