SPECIFICITY IN PLYOMETRIC TRAINING FOR THE DISCUS THROW

  • Scott E. Calder
  • Carole J. Zebas

Abstract

Methods of artificially manipulating the athlete's body into an ideal technique for competition in the discus event in track and field has not been firmly established through research studies. Although McLaughlin (1981), Jarver (1980), Moynihan (1983), Woicik (1982), Gambetta (1981), and Wilt (1976) stated their athletes obtained better throwing patterns by using plyometrics than by using traditional training methods, their training methods have not been tested through critical research. McLaughlin (1981) used a platform four inches to six inches in height at the back of the circle and had his athletes land in an exaggerated bent-leg position prior to the drive off the power leg. Jarver (1980) and Gambetta (1 81) had their athletes land in the center of the circle from a 30 to 40 centimeter elevated position and then perform a normal delivery. Wilt (1976) established 12 to 18 inches as his elevation height for throwers to use with five repetitions of six to eight sets.
Published
2008-04-13
Section
Coaching and Sports Activities